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International Game Developers Association calls for studio leaders to do more to protect jobs

The International Game Developers Association (IGDA) has called for the games industry to do more to protect developer jobs and prevent further layoffs.

Citing “more than 8,700” job losses this year alone, the IGDA said that “the gravity of this situation and its impact on the industry cannot be overstated”, and called for studio leaders to “implement sustainable measures within their organisations to avoid unnecessary layoffs”.

Newscast: Why are there so many games industry layoffs?Watch on YouTube

“Developers hold legitimate concerns regarding the stability of their careers and the industry as a whole,” the organisation said in a statement. “Talented individuals, particularly those from historically marginalised communities, may seek opportunities beyond the games industry due to the instability, leading to skill gaps and underrepresentation of various demographics.

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“To foster a resilient and thriving industry, studios must better plan for sustainable growth and stop driving talent away from their own companies and the greater industry.”

IGDA has collated several support resources for developers affected by the layoffs and is offering free membership and priority mentorship for those impacted.

“Together, we can navigate the current challenges facing developers and the industry at large with resilience and empathy while building a sustainable future for games and all those who create them.”

IGDA’s statement come after more than 15,000 job cuts and studio closures over the last 18 months, most recently Possibility Space, where founder Jeff Strain blamed the studio’s closure on confidential leaks by employees.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, we’ve seen more of the sector pivot to unionisation in recent months. Just Cause developer Avalanche is the most recent company to confirm plans to enter a collective bargaining agreement with Swedish unions in a bid to standardise “frameworks” around employment rights, including salaries, benefits, employee influence, and career support.

GamesIndustry.biz’s Chris Dring recently took a closer look at the layoffs for Eurogamer, offering insight into what, exactly, is going on.

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